The 5-Minute Guide to ACT: A Visual ACT Elevator Pitch

The 5-Minute Guide to ACT: A Visual ACT Elevator Pitch

The challenge of explaining ACT

As an ACT trainer, one of the most challenging things for me is when someone who isn’t familiar with ACT says “What’s this whole ACT thing about?” Let’s just say my ACT elevator pitch needs some work! It’s tricky to try to describe something that is supposed to be an experiential therapy. And then there is the whole conundrum of trying to use language to explain a theory that holds that language is at the heart of the problem. But I find that “you just have to experience it” is the trainer equivalent to “because I said so” and is equally unsatisfying (and also not very helpful). So this week I was thrilled when I got another tool in my “what is ACT” arsenal thanks to ACBS member Dov Ben-Yaacov and the 5-minute Guide to ACT Pictogram he created.

The 5-Minute Guide to ACT Pictogram (click on picture to download)

This isn’t something I would necessarily share with clients. However, I do think this simple, yet surprisingly comprehensive pictogram could be very helpful in orienting students and those learning ACT to the general gestalt of how ACT, RFT, and Functional Contextualism fit together.

Another example of the generosity in the ACBS community

One of the things I most love about the Contextual Behavioral Science community is how incredibly generous the community is. I can’t imagine how much time it took Dov to create this. And then he just went ahead and posted it for anyone to use it for free. So it’s with much gratitude to Dov Ben-Yaacov that I pass this along to you. Please use it as it is helpful and also continue to credit Dov Ben-Yaacov as you do so. 

Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

Author: Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

Jenna is a clinical psychologist who specializes in working with people who struggle with relationship and intimacy difficulties and with those who have a trauma history. Her research focuses on developing compassion-based interventions targeting stigma, shame, and chronic self-criticism.

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