Values conflicts? Is that a thing?

September 26, 2018

Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

I love values. People tend to know that about me and so I often get presented with values questions from colleagues or friends. And one of the most common questions that seems to come up has to do with what to do with supposed values conflicts. While I usually try to approach these questions with openness and curiosity, I’m going to be totally honest here. These questions about “values conflicts” confuse me. It’s like the feeling I had once when I saw an advertisement for a medication to help with the “problem” of “inadequate” eyelashes (true story!). My response was, “Wait, that’s a problem? I didn’t know that was a thing to worry about? Maybe I have that problem and Read more

Values: Clarity of Purpose, Crisis not Required

August 27, 2018

Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

July was a heck of a month. Having just returned from a 5-month sabbatical, I was ready to get settled back into my life here in Portland when I got a phone call that stopped me in my tracks. We’ve all had those moments, when an unexpected event challenges us to consider what really matters, often with shocking, jarring clarity. Maybe it’s a phone call that a loved one is being rushed to the hospital. Or maybe it’s the day you lose your “dream job” or your physician gives you that unexpected diagnosis that will change the trajectory of your life. Or maybe it’s the moment your loved one looks into your eyes and says they are leaving you. These Read more

“Science and everyday life cannot and should not be separated.” — Rosalind Franklin Research in Clinical Practice Clinical psychologists typically pursue either research or practice. While researchers typically have minimal contact with clients, practitioners typically have minimal access to resources that make research possible. For clinicians who do conduct research, few do so in settings in which they treat clients (i.e. “practice settings”). Instead, clinical research typically occurs in academic institutions, hospitals and research agencies (e.g. the National Institutes of Health). Yet, research conducted in practice settings could have unique benefits. Researchers would have on-the-ground insights into mental health and wellness, and could incorporate this knowledge into their research interests, hypotheses and designs. Clinicians would have insights into state of Read more

New books on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in 2017

January 24, 2018

Jason Luoma, Ph.D.

We do our best to update our Learning ACT Resource Guide with the newest resources on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that come out each year. You can download the newest version of the guide here. As part of the guide, we’ve pulled together a comprehensive list of all the ACT that have ever been published.  Below are the 11 new books we discovered when wee revised the guide at the end of 2017: Books for therapists: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Couples: A Clinician’s Guide to Using Mindfulness, Values, and Schema Awareness to Rebuild Relationships Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Substance Abuse: A Clinician’s Guide to Using Practical Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Interventions for Alcoholism and Drug Addiction ACT for Adolescents: Treating Read more

Our CEO, Jason Luoma, Ph.D., has just published the second edition of the book Learning ACT! Learning ACT, Second Edition has been thoroughly rewritten with new exercises, references, and totally new chapters. It also pulls together resources on ACT from across the literature to guide therapists who are new to ACT. In this fully revised and updated edition you’ll find exercises to help you practice, in the therapist role, ACT’s unique six process model. Numerous therapy vignettes illustrate how ACT actually looks in clinical practice and give you a chance to step into the role of therapist, to practice your skills before stepping into the room with an actual client. There are also downloadable extras that include role-played examples of the Read more