Resource Development for Insomnia Treatment

Resource Development for Insomnia Treatment

Do you practice CBT for Insomnia? 

Would you like to be involved in a community effort to create a needed resource?

In the field of behavioral sleep medicine (BSM), the sleep diary is an essential and ubiquitous tool. While there has been progress in creating a standard sleep diary form, there has not yet been any advances in providing practitioners with a common and easy to use interface for this standard.

This has left providers stuck with the task of calculating sleep data in inefficient  ways such as by pen and paper or ‘re-inventing the wheel’ by creating their own  means of calculating and tracking the data via MS excel or MS access. Large  amounts of time and creativity are lost as people’s efforts to tackle this problem are not shared with the community.

To address this problem Dr. Scott Rower is leading a team of people in the BSM community to create a simple and accessible user interface based on the standardized consensus sleep diary.  This freely available webpage will allow any provider the ability to calculate their patient’s sleep data in order to inform treatment decision making.

Want to get involved?  Learn more here.

This project is funded through an internal grant at Portland Psychotherapy Clinic, Research & Training Center

5 Excellent Reasons to Treat Insomnia

5 Excellent Reasons to Treat Insomnia

1. Insomnia can cause depression.

A collection of research suggests that untreated insomnia doubles the chance of developing depression, as a causal factor (4 sources – one, two, three, four)

2. Insomnia often does not resolve once the depression is treated or without focused insomnia treatment (source 1; source 2)

3. Untreated insomnia more than doubles the chance of relapse of depression and other mental health diagnoses.  (source 1; source 2)

4. Effective, short-term, focused insomnia treatment exists

Cognitive Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) produces significant, sustained relief that is comparable to medications in the short-term & more effective in the long-term (4 meta-analyses – onetwo, three, four).

5. Insomnia represents a significant factor in non-response to treatment (source).

Conclusion

Insomnia is a major factor in clinical response and vulnerability to mental illness.  It does not tend to improve without focused treatment.  Treatment exists & over 30 years of evidence suggests that CBT-I is the most effective. 

UPCOMING TRAINING EVENTS