Workshops and Classes for Therapists

February 24, 2017, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm · Portland, OR · Details

ACT with Compassion: An Introduction to Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Highly Self-critical and Shame Prone Clients This workshop will provide an overview of how shame and self-criticism can keep clients stuck in unworkable patterns of behavior and how this literature informs interventions for chronic self-criticism and shame. Therapists will have an opportunity to experience various ACT and self-compassion exercises in relation to their own tendencies toward self-criticism or shame. Therapists can expect to walk away with an increased experiential and practical understanding of how to use acceptance, mindfulness, perspective-taking, and values interventions with clients suffering from chronic shame and self-criticism. Read more

ACT with Compassion: Deepening Your Skill in Working with Highly Self-critical and Shame Prone Clients

February 25, 2017, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm · Portland, OR · Details

ACT with Compassion: Deepening Your Skill in Working with Highly Self-critical and Shame Prone Clients This workshop will explore the ACT theory of self and its centrality in working with shame, self-criticism, and the development of self-compassion. In addition to focusing on the conceptualized self, we will also examine how the client’s construction of the therapist is important in working with these types of clients. A particular focus of this workshop will be on the use of perspective taking interventions to help clients develop newer and more flexible ways of relating to themselves. Participants will engage in their own experiential work in small groups using ACT processes. Read more

Bringing Values to Life in ACT: Moving from the conceptual to the experiential

April 28, 2017, 12:45 pm – 4:15 pm · Portland, OR · Details

Values work is an integral component of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). It can be argued that values are the core of the therapy, guiding every ACT intervention; they provide the “why” in any ACT-based treatment plan. In addition, it is often the values emphasis in ACT, with its shift away from focusing on symptom-reduction or psychopathology towards creating meaning, purpose, and vitality, that draws both clients and clinicians to ACT. However, clinicians often find it difficult to move beyond simply articulating values in a conceptual way to knowing how to bring values alive for their clients. Read more