Why Google+ is Good for Therapists: Respect for Diversity

Why Google+ is Good for Therapists: Respect for Diversity

“Don’t be evil”—Google motto

I just created my new Google+ account yesterday and I’m very pleased. No, it’s not because it’s the latest and greatest social networking tool (though, those circles are pretty cool). And no, it’s not because finally, after holding out from joining Facebook for all these years, my friends and family will finally get off my back about needing to move into the 21st century. Nope. Those things are fine but, what I’m really impressed by though was what I found as I was going through the process of creating my account. Specifically, under the “gender” box you could choose from an option of “male,” “female,” and “other.” Wow! Now that’s not just “not being evil,” (Google’s motto) — that’s pretty darn enlightened! Yes, of course I’d like to see them use a fill-in-the-blank format so people who identify as something other than “male” or “female” don’t have to identify as “other”, but it’s a great start. This is a great example of how something as small as demographic questions can reflect our values. We have come a long way in terms of inclusivity and awareness of the rich diversity of our world when a Fortune 500 company like Google makes a statement like this.

It also got me thinking about ways that we here at Portland Psychotherapy can further advocate for our clinic’s core value to support diversity and inclusivity and to make quality, evidence-based mental health services available to all member of our community. I came across this brochure published by the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association that offers some great suggestions to help make your practice more inclusive and affirmative. I also found this sample of a “culturally competent intake form” from the King County Public Health Department that includes ways to structure your intake forms around issues of relationships and sexuality that are most inclusive.

Ways to Improve Inclusivity in Your Therapy Practice

Here are a few other suggestions of things you might want to consider to make your practice more welcoming to all:

  • Use fill-in-the-blank spaces rather than check boxes on intake forms for categories like “gender,” “sexual orientation,” “relationship status,” and “ethnicity”.
  • If you ask about religion on your forms, be sure to also include an option for “atheist” as a viable choice.
  • If you have brochures or magazines in your waiting room, consider whether or not they represent a diverse range of experiences and lifestyles (e.g. Do you only have “Parenting” magazine in your waiting room or do you also have “The Advocate”?)
  • If it seems clinically appropriate, ask clients which pronoun (e.g., he, she, it, they) they would like to be referred by.
  • When talking about sexual or relationship partners, be cautious about assumptions about gender, legal status (i.e. married versus partnered), monogamy, sexual orientation, etc. Using the term “partner or partners” may be more inclusive than “spouse” for example.

So, take a cue from Google+ and maybe revisit your office forms and practices to see if there are ways in which you could create a more welcoming and inclusive environment for all those you serve. I know we’re going to be revisiting that issue here at the clinic as well.

UPCOMING TRAINING EVENTS

January 31, 2020, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm · Portland, OR · Details

This workshop is intended to be part 1 of a two day workshop, but can also be taken on its own. This workshop is useful for therapists who want an update on the current clinically applicable research on how shame functions, including an overview of how and when shame tends to be adaptive versus maladaptive. This day has two primary goals: 1. To provide an overview of research on shame and self-criticism that can guide clinical practice and 2. To allow therapists to experience the model from the inside-out so as to develop greater personal self-compassion and a deeper intuitive understanding of compassion-based intervention strategies. Read more

February 1, 2020, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm · Portland, OR · Details

This workshop is intended to be part 2 of a two day workshop, but can also be taken on its own. If you already have a thorough understanding of the functions of shame and a good understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, then it is you will probably be OK taking just the second day of this workshop. The workshop proceeds to discuss how ACT processes can be focused on addressing chronic and pervasive shame-based difficulties, with a particular focus on flexible perspective taking. Demonstrations of how to use perspective taking and compassion-fostering strategies with clients will be provided and attendees will also practice in small groups. An overview of chair work in the context of ACT will be provided. Read more

February 29, 2020, 9:00 am – 12:15 pm · Portland, OR · Details

Exposure is one of most the effective treatments for anxiety, trauma, and obsessive compulsive and related disorders (e.g., OCD, PTSD, panic disorder). A transdiagnostic intervention, exposure involves the repeated and systematic engagement with avoided stimuli that cause anxiety. Unfortunately, exposure remains underutilized by clinicians (e.g., Scherr, Herbert, & Forman, 2015), mostly due to misunderstandings of how exposure works and perceived difficulty of using it with clients. This half-day workshop will address these gaps by drawing from research on enhancing clinician understanding of and ways to overcome barriers to delivering exposure therapy (Farrell et al., 2016). Using didactics, role-play, and experiential exercises, participants will learn flexible application of exposure for a variety of clinical targets. Read more

April 17 and 18, 2020, 9:15 am – 5:00 pm · Portland, OR · Details

Do you ever “get stuck” as a therapist? Do some of your clients press your “hot buttons”? Do you ever find yourself struggling and thinking about “what do I do next” or feeling anxious, scared or stressed in therapy? In this workshop we will work on clarifying your therapist values and defining what is “difficult” about “difficult” clients. Through discussions, demonstrations and roleplays we will then work on these difficult clients and look at the processes from a compassionate ACT perspective. Read more