Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Books from 2019-2020

Each year, we update our Learning ACT Resource Guide with the newest resources on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that come out each year. The guide contains a comprehensive list of all the ACT books that have ever been published. You can browse this list, organized by category, on our LearningACT website. Below, are the 23 new books we discovered when revising the guide in July of 2020:

Books for Therapists

Books for Clients

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Books from 2018

Each year, we update our Learning ACT Resource Guide with the newest resources on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that come out each year. The guide contains a comprehensive list of all of all the ACT that have ever been published. You can browse this list, organized by category, on our LearningACT website. Below, are the 43 new books we discovered when revising the guide at the end of 2018:

Learning ACT

Books for Therapists

Books for Clients

New books on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in 2017


We do our best to update our Learning ACT Resource Guide with the newest resources on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that come out each year.

You can download the newest version of the guide here.

As part of the guide, we’ve pulled together a comprehensive list of all the ACT that have ever been published.  Below are the 11 new books we discovered when wee revised the guide at the end of 2017:

Books for therapists:

ACT Books for the public:

We hope you find this new version of the Learning ACT Resource Guide useful in your practice. If you have any feedback, we’d love to hear it!

Disclosure: These links are affiliate links, meaning Portland Psychotherapy will be receive a small commission if you decide to buy something through Amazon after clicking on them. If you appreciate our work in putting this guide together (which we’ve done for free), then maybe you’ll be happy to have that happen, but if not, just buy the book without clicking on the link. It doesn’t cost you anything either way.

CEO of Portland Psychotherapy publishes second edition of “Learning ACT”

Our CEO, Jason Luoma, Ph.D., has just published the second edition of the book Learning ACT!

Learning ACT, Second Edition has been thoroughly rewritten with new exercises, references, and totally new chapters. It also pulls together resources on ACT from across the literature to guide therapists who are new to ACT.

In this fully revised and updated edition you’ll find exercises to help you practice, in the therapist role, ACT’s unique six process model. Numerous therapy vignettes illustrate how ACT actually looks in clinical practice and give you a chance to step into the role of therapist, to practice your skills before stepping into the room with an actual client. There are also downloadable extras that include role-played examples of the core ACT processes in action.

The two most novel parts of the book (outlined here in more detail) and based on recent changes in contextual behavioral science are:

  • A thoroughly rewritten chapter on flexible perspective taking/self-as-context that makes this often confusing process much more accessible and useful
  • A new chapter on how to tailor ACT to take into account different cultural contexts and identities

Read more on the New Harbinger website

Learning ACT second edition

Praise for Learning ACT:

“In this authoritative text, Luoma, Hayes, and Walser present a clearly written and practical step-by-step guide for therapists who are using acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Firmly rooted in contextual behavioral science and derived from a well-articulated theory, this text clearly describes and illustrates the concrete strategies to target a set of key processes that are critical to improve the lives of people. Every clinician should be familiar with it. It is a masterful book. I highly recommend it.”
—Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, professor of psychology at Boston University, past president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, and author of Emotion in Therapy

“This second edition is an exceptional guide for the skillful and flexible implementation of ACT principles. The chapters outline the six core flexible ACT processes and their methods, with case examples and dialogues that bring the information to life. The book includes a unique and invaluable set of training tools and tests of core competencies. This is a masterful ‘how to’ for ACT suitable for clinicians at any level of training and experience.”
—Michelle G. Craske, PhD, distinguished professor, and director of the Anxiety and Depression Research Center at the University of California, Los Angeles

“Firmly grounded in contextual behavioral science (CBS), superbly organized with lucid and comprehensive explanation of all ACT concepts and competencies, and loaded with clinical pearls and pitfalls to avoid, this book lives up to the title and then some, as one of the best books for learning ACT. Further, the clinical vignettes and self-reflective exercises will deepen and advance the practice of more seasoned practitioners of ACT. The updated text and the new inclusion of an excellent chapter on culture and diversity make this edition more relevant and invaluable than ever in this diverse, globalizing world. This book is simply a ‘must-have’ for any serious ACT practitioner!”
—Kenneth P. Fung, MD, FRCPC, MSc, associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Toronto; clinical director of the Asian Initiative in Mental Health at the University Health Network; and president-elect of the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture

“ACT has been at the forefront of the pioneering third-wave cognitive behavioral therapies for many years. Not only has it uniquely linked the human evolution of language and symbol formation to mental processes that can cause suffering (relational frame theory [RFT]), but it has articulated six clear processes for therapeutic intervention centered around developing psychological flexibility. For both novice and expert therapists of any orientation, you could not want for a more clearly articulated, easily accessible, and therapeutically wise approach than this by these leaders and pioneers in the field. Full of therapeutic transcripts with clear, insightful descriptions of the therapeutic process, this beautifully written book is an outstanding contribution to therapeutic literature that is bound to become a classic and an essential text.”
—Paul Gilbert, professor at the University of Derby, creator of compassion-focused therapy (CFT), founder of the Compassionate Mind Foundation, and author of The Compassionate Mind

“The tremendous dedication of thought and care Luoma, Hayes, and Walser infused into this second edition of Learning ACT is evident in the breadth and depth of every chapter. Their labor of love resulted in a preeminent and indispensable guide for novice and advanced ACT practitioners alike. Especially valuable are the fifty core competency exercises that stimulate experiential engagement. The chapter on adapting ACT to cultural contexts makes this a cutting-edge treatment for individuals from every walk of life who want to move in valued directions while welcoming all their thoughts and feelings.”
—Mavis Tsai, PhD, coauthor of A Guide to Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, and research scientist and clinical faculty at the University of Washington

 

Tailoring Therapy for Gender and Sexual Minority Clients

Clients with minority identities related to their sexual orientation or gender seek therapy for a variety of concerns, and many therapists use the evidence-based approaches they are most comfortable with to respond to the presenting symptoms. The impact of possessing a stigmatized identity, encountering discrimination, or witnessing political debates regarding one’s belonging in society lead to vulnerabilities and challenges that set these clients apart. Some of the most researched difficulties experienced by gender and sexual minorities that traditional treatment packages may not respond to are internalized stigma, rejection sensitivity, and shame.

When Our Worst Thoughts are About Ourselves

Internalized stigma (i.e., internalized homophobia, biphobia, or transphobia) refers to those attitudes or stereotypes about a minority group present in our culture that might be internalized and believed by an individual. These sorts of thoughts can be painful, from assertions that attraction to the same sex is a result of sexual abuse as a child (a theory that might be repeatedly asserted by family or religious leaders), to ideas about what the future holds (“I’ll never be respected in my field”, “Real relationships don’t exist for people like me”, or “My parents will never love me again”).

Tips for addressing internalized homophobia:

Don’t argue with the fears – a client can get caught in a cycle of attempting to convince ourselves of which fears are true or not. Mindfulness techniques can help the therapist and client to observe when those thoughts arise, how they affect the client, and to notice those moments when the client might decide to engage with the world differently.
Defusion exercises can be helpful – fusion refers to the way that our thoughts, in that echo chamber between our ears, can seem completely true. Those same thoughts might feel lighter in the course of a day when a client is able to notice how the believability rises and falls, or old habits of responding to those thoughts.

Armor Up: Avoiding Rejection and Intimacy

Growing up, many GSM individuals have experienced rejection – and not just rejection, but rejection from parents, siblings, and those who knew them and had appeared to love them most! Learning to be less guarded emotionally, to engage vulnerably and authentically in relationships after such experiences of rejection, is one of the most difficult tasks for GSM clients to overcome, in my clinical experience – particularly if one’s parents do not allow for reestablishing a relationship after adjusting to a child coming out.

Tips for building client capacity for vulnerability and intimacy:

Drawing attention to the relationship in the room – for many clients, it is easy to discount a therapist’s warmth as part of their job, or service in response to payment. Slow down, be mindful, and guide a client to notice the feel in the room with therapist.
A warm relationship including disclosure – while associated with better therapeutic relationships for all clients, a relationship that emphasizes the client’s genuine care for the client and authentic responses to events in the client’s life are particularly important.
Encouraging risks outside of therapy – tracking and sharing experiences of behaving in a more vulnerable or authentic way, particularly when the risk of rejection feels possible, can both build confidence and reduce fear of being fully seen by others.

When You Can’t Seem to Love Yourself

Shame is a complicated emotion, and tends to involve barriers to notice or let in warmth from others, a harsh and judgmental attitude toward yourself, and a feeling of isolating difference from other people. According to some experts, like Paul Gilbert, this is an emotion with evolutionary roots tied to being a social animal. We want to feel safe in our group, as it’s a dangerous world to go alone. Shame also may have different origins for GSM people. One recent study of cisgender men’s experiences found that while heterosexual men have a variety of people, places, and situations that come up when reporting early shame memories, gay men overwhelmingly report experiences of feeling shamed by their fathers. In this study, caregiver shame was more associated with depressive symptoms.

Use compassion training skills to address shame:

Compassion for others – at times the most accessible way to notice how a lack of safety or of shaming environments affects a GSM client is to encourage exploring how those around them are affected. Caring for others warms the heart to care for ourselves.
Compassion from others – as described above, guardedness to the emotional responses of others can become habit for many GSM people. In CFT, practicing guided visualization exercises that involve receiving warmth from a loving, ideal figure is sometimes required as a precursor to feeling safe receiving it from the therapist or others in the client’s life.
Compassion toward ourselves – in the face of bias, relationship challenges, or navigating politically charged environments, GSM clients benefit from the reminder to slow down and notice those parts in need of care. To work effectively, one must be able to both generate and receive compassion, so this is often the most difficult step for clients (or clinicians).

If you are a therapist wanting to learn more about responding to these common processes in psychotherapy, you can read more about these approaches here, or attend an upcoming workshop on this topic at Portland Psychotherapy.

Matthew D. Skinta, Ph.D., ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist and a trainer of acceptance & commitment therapy and functional analytic psychotherapy. He directs Palo Alto University’s Sexual & Gender Identities Clinic, and is passionate about increasing the application of evidence-based care to work with GSM clients.

UPCOMING TRAINING EVENTS

An Introduction to Exposure Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Traditional and Inhibitory Learning Approaches

Dr. Brian Pilecki
January 29, 2021 from 12:00pm-1:30pm PST
Exposure therapy is the gold-standard treatment for anxiety and obsessive compulsive and related disorders. The aim of this workshop is to provide a solid foundation in theory and knowledge for those newer to exposure therapy. This workshop will include a brief history of exposure therapy, including a description of its roots in classical and operant conditioning. Read More.


Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Guide Flexible Exposure

Dr. Brian Thompson
February 26, 2021 from 1-2:30pm

Drawing from the ACT model, participants will learn to conceptualize and create exposure exercises to maximize flexibility. We will explore common pitfalls in using ACT as a context for exposure and how to create ACT-consistent exposure exercises for clients who are skeptical of “acceptance” and appear disinterested when you try to engage them about values. The presenter will use practice-based data to support these principles (Thompson, Twohig, & Luoma, in press). Read More.


An Introduction to Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy for Clinicians

Dr. Brian Pilecki and Jason Luoma, Ph.D.
March 26, 2021 from 9am-12:10pm

Psychedelic assisted therapy is emerging as a highly effective form of mental health treatment. This workshop will provide health care professionals an overview of this new clinical area. The workshop will highlight the importance of preparation and integration in therapy using a harm reduction approach. The current legal status of psychedelics will be reviewed, including Oregon’s recent passing of an initiative to legalize psilocybin-assisted therapy. Finally, diversity issues around lack of access for underserved and non-majority populations will be explored. Read More.


How to be Experiential in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Jason Luoma, Ph.D.
April 23, 2021 from 12-1pm

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is, at its core, an experiential treatment, but is frequently delivered in a non-experiential way. Experiential learning involves going beyond verbal discussion, insight, and explanations of experience. But how do we do this in ACT and how do we know when we are spending too much time engaged in non-experiential modes of learning? This workshop will outline a simple model you can use to identify when you are in less or more experiential modes during therapy and easy methods to switch to more experiential modes. You will then have a chance to practice it in breakout groups and get feedback. Read More.


Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Dr. Brian Pilecki
May 21, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop provides a chance to learn concrete methods for conceptualizing cases from the perspective of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Formulating a useful case conceptualization is a foundational clinical skill that is essential in delivering effective treatment, and one that can be often overlooked in the process of working with clients. Participants will learn several formats for doing formal case conceptualization outside of session as a means to further develop knowledge and skill with ACT theory, as well as to learn a means to enhance treatment planning. The importance of ongoing case conceptualization throughout a course of treatment will be emphasized, as well as common pitfalls in conceptualizing client problems. Participants will also have a chance to practice newly learned skills with a case in breakout groups. Read More.


ACT Precision Training: In-Session Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Help You be Focused and Strategic in Your Interventions

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D
June 18, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop provides a chance to learn and practice in-session, in-the-moment case conceptualization of cases from the perspective of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This workshop focuses on helping you use ACT theory & in-session clinical markers to make more precise and strategic interventions. The main goal of this workshop is to help you become more adept at identifying in-session client behaviors that are indicators for particular ACT processes that are likely to be most relevant. The workshop uses a process we call ACT Circuit Training, which involves intensive analysis of a video of an ACT session and intentional practice in conceptualizing client behavior and generating possible ACT responses, followed by discussion and feedback. Read More.


ACT Agility Training: In-Session Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Increase Flexible Responding

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D
July 16, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop provides a chance to learn and practice in-session, in-the-moment case conceptualization of cases from the perspective of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This workshop is intended to help therapists be more flexible and nimble in their use of ACT processes, strengthening their ability to fluidly shift as needed between processes within sessions. Therapist learning ACT often develop tunnel vision, focusing too much on particular processes or responding rigidly when more flexibility is needed. Read More.


Therapy and Research in Psychedelic Science (TRIPS) Seminar Series

Second Friday of each month from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (PT)

TRIPS is an online seminar series that hosts speakers discussing science-informed presentations and discussions about psychedelics to educate healthcare professionals. This series was created to guide healthcare providers and students preparing to be professionals towards the most relevant, pragmatic, and essential information about psychedelic-assisted therapy, changing legal statuses, and harm reduction approaches in order to better serve clients and communities. This seminar series is a fundraiser for our clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder that Portland Psychotherapy investigators are preparing for and starting in the Fall of 2021. All proceeds after presenter remuneration will go to fund this clinical trial. Read more.

December 11th, 2020 – Ethical and Legal Considerations in Providing Psychedelic Integration Therapy with Brian Pilecki, Ph.D. & Jason Luoma, Ph.D.
January 8th, 2021 – What’s it Like to Trip? The Patient Experience in Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy with Brian Pilecki, Ph.D.
February 12th, 2021 – 5-MEO-DMT with Rafael Lancelotta, M.S.
March 12th, 2021 – What does Psilocybin-Assisted Therapy for Depression Look Like? A Clinical Case Presentation based on a Recent Clinical Trial from Johns Hopkins with Alan K. Davis, Ph.D.
April 9th, 2021 – Gregory Wells, Ph.D.
May 14th, 2021  Research on MDMA and Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy: An Overview of the Evidence for Clinicians with Jason Luoma, Ph.D.