Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Books from 2019-2020

Each year, we update our Learning ACT Resource Guide with the newest resources on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that come out each year. The guide contains a comprehensive list of all the ACT books that have ever been published. You can browse this list, organized by category, on our LearningACT website. Below, are the 23 new books we discovered when revising the guide in July of 2020:

Books for Therapists

Books for Clients

Do you ever find yourself getting stuck as a therapist?

Do you ever get stuck as a therapist?

Our next workshop is about this topic. We are bringing in one of the most popular ACT trainers in Europe, Rikke Kjelgaard, to deliver this unique workshop about getting unstuck as a therapist, while treating yourself with kindness and compassion. Rikke Kjelgaard is an extremely dynamic and engaging presenter who will help you explore your stuck places and help you get free to be the therapist you most want to be (and also a good friend to yourself).

She wrote this inspiring blog post so that potential attendees have a sense for what it will be like to be in a workshop with her:

https://www.rikkekjelgaard.com/blog/thestucktherapist/

Here are a few excerpts from the post:

“I wanted to walk the talk. I wanted to show her ACT. I wanted to sit with her inside of the darkness with kindness and compassion. She was not alone. Nor was I.”
“My invitation is that you ask yourself what lessons you could take away from whatever experiences you have had of being stuck? And might you offer yourself some kindness and compassion for being human? ”

The Compassionate and Flexible Therapist-Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Bring out the Best in you as a Therapist
Presenter: Rikke Kjelgaard, ACT Denmark
Date and Location: April 17-18, 2020, Portland
To sign up or get more info: https://portlandpsychotherapytraining.com/workshops-and-classes-for-therapists/

We’re thrilled to be able to bring Rikke out from Denmark and hope you will join us for this unique opportunity to see such a powerful and inspiring trainer present.

Author: Jason Luoma, Ph.D.

Jason is a psychologist who researches ways to help people with chronic shame and stigma and also works clinically with people struggling with those same problems.

The 5-Minute Guide to ACT: A Visual ACT Elevator Pitch

The 5-Minute Guide to ACT: A Visual ACT Elevator Pitch

The challenge of explaining ACT

As an ACT trainer, one of the most challenging things for me is when someone who isn’t familiar with ACT says “What’s this whole ACT thing about?” Let’s just say my ACT elevator pitch needs some work! It’s tricky to try to describe something that is supposed to be an experiential therapy. And then there is the whole conundrum of trying to use language to explain a theory that holds that language is at the heart of the problem. But I find that “you just have to experience it” is the trainer equivalent to “because I said so” and is equally unsatisfying (and also not very helpful). So this week I was thrilled when I got another tool in my “what is ACT” arsenal thanks to ACBS member Dov Ben-Yaacov and the 5-minute Guide to ACT Pictogram he created.

The 5-Minute Guide to ACT Pictogram (click on picture to download)

This isn’t something I would necessarily share with clients. However, I do think this simple, yet surprisingly comprehensive pictogram could be very helpful in orienting students and those learning ACT to the general gestalt of how ACT, RFT, and Functional Contextualism fit together.

Another example of the generosity in the ACBS community

One of the things I most love about the Contextual Behavioral Science community is how incredibly generous the community is. I can’t imagine how much time it took Dov to create this. And then he just went ahead and posted it for anyone to use it for free. So it’s with much gratitude to Dov Ben-Yaacov that I pass this along to you. Please use it as it is helpful and also continue to credit Dov Ben-Yaacov as you do so.

Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

Author: Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

Jenna is a clinical psychologist who specializes in working with people who struggle with relationship and intimacy difficulties and with those who have a trauma history. Her research focuses on developing compassion-based interventions targeting stigma, shame, and chronic self-criticism.

Tips for Therapists Making the Change to ICD-10

Tips for Therapists Making the Change to ICD-10

In case you didn’t know already, starting October 1st 2015, insurance companies will start using the ICD-10 system for diagnostic codes, rather than the ICD-9/DSM codes. For any Date of Service (not date of claim submission) Sept. 30th or before, clinicians will still need to use the DSM codes. But any claims submitted for dates of service Oct. 1st or later will be rejected if they are not ICD codes. If you are a clinician billing insurance, you need to make this change or else you will be soon running into a lot of problems with rejecte claims.

What’s the difference between the DSM and the ICD system? Do I still need both of them?

DSM is a diagnostic determination guide. It can be a resource in providing information needed to make an accurate diagnosis, but it is a ICD 10 diagnosis (not a DSM diagnosis) that we are to now assign clients. It should be noted that the DSM may not be the ONLY or definitive source in determining diagnosis. According to the APA, “Psychologists might access that content through the DSM or through other resources such as the professional literature, practice guidelines or other accepted sources [to determine appropriate diagnosis]”.

Can’t we just have a simple chart that converts our DSM codes to ICD 10 codes?

No. The DSM V is NOT synonymous with the ICD-10. There are MANY more codes in the ICD-10 than there are in either the ICD-9 (which is roughly equivalent to DSM-IV) or the DSM V. There are approximately 14,000 codes in the ICD-9 but more than 68,000 codes in the ICD-10 (though of course we mental health professionals will only use a small fraction of those codes). While most of the ICD-10 codes are in the DSM V, some of the more specific ones are not. So, psychologists can’t simply convert DSM codes to ICD-10 codes automatically. PTSD is a good example of why a simple conversion from DSM V to ICD-10 isn’t going to be accurate. The DSM-V only has a code for PTSD “unspecified” type, while the ICD-10 has diagnostic codes for both PTSD “Acute” and “Chronic” types that are not in the DSM-V.

How can I find the correct diagnosis?

In general, you can find the correct corresponding ICD 10 code for most of the DSM diagnoses listed in the back of the DSM V. However, there are some ICD10 codes that aren’t listed in the DSM V, as in the case mentioned above about PTSD. So you can’t just rely on the DSM. Instead, we suggest crosschecking your diagnosis using one of several “crosswalk” tools available online. Two such resources would be:

  1. ICD-10 Code Lookup
  2. ICD-10 Tabular List

Need for specificity, particular in relation to substance use disorders

One factor accounting for the increased number of codes in the ICD-10 pertains to the number of specifiers for the different diagnoses in the ICD 10. This is especially true for the substance use disorders. The increased use of specifiers is a main difference many clinicians will need to become familiar with as they move forward using the ICD-10 system starting Oct. 1st. It is important to be as specific as possible in selecting ICD-10-CM codes — that is, when known, use the code structure to indicate severity or other meaningful diagnostic information. Try to avoid “unspecified” diagnoses, as plans may not reimburse for them — plans are looking for increasing specificity in diagnosis.

No More NOS – “Unspecified” versus “Other Specified” diagnoses.

When the DSM switched from IV to V, the NOS specifier was replaced with two options “Unspecified” and “Other Specified”. The ICD 10 also uses this distinction. “Other Specified Disorder” allows the clinician to specify the reason that the criteria for a specific disorder are not met (it is required to give reason(s) why the criteria are not met in the diagnosis field).  An example of this would be other specified depressive disorder, short-duration depressive episode, 9 days.

“Unspecified Disorder” allows the clinician the option to forgo specification.  This would be used instead of deferring a diagnosis when a client does not meet criteria AND the provider cannot specify due to inadequate info.  This will likely not be an acceptable reimbursable diagnosis.

It has been suggested that when you have the choice between an “Unspecified” and “Other Specified” diagnosis and both seem equally valid, choose the latter, and document in the chart what criteria were not met for you to use another diagnoses of this category.

How do I diagnose substance use disorders with the ICD-10?

This is probably the biggest category of changes from the DSM to ICD-10 system. The APA has created a very useful step-by-step guideline for diagnosing substance use problems using the ICD-10 system that can be accessed here.

Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

Author: Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D

Jenna is a clinical psychologist who specializes in working with people who struggle with relationship and intimacy difficulties and with those who have a trauma history. Her research focuses on developing compassion-based interventions targeting stigma, shame, and chronic self-criticism.

Creating a Peer-Led Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Consultation Group: The Portland Model

Creating a Peer-Led Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Consultation Group: The Portland Model

In 2005, the clinic directors (Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D. & Jason Luoma, Ph.D.) at Portland Psychotherapy helped found a peer-consultation group to provide a place for local therapists to learn and practice Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and to build supportive community of like-minded practitioners.

The ACT peer consultation group underwent a number of iterations in the years that followed. It took several years for the group to find its feet, and there was process and evolution in creating a workable structure and set of roles to help guide the meetings.

Recently, several of us got together and wrote a paper describing the process of creating an ACT peer consultation group and the structure we created. We’d run some workshops demonstrating (e.g., role-playing) the model—we called “The Portland Model”—and found that clinicians around the world were very interested in learning how they could start their own ACT peer consultation group. After running some workshops, we agreed we were ready to write up our experiences in order to reach a larger audience. We each contributed a section of the paper, and I took on the role of editing and putting it all together.

And it’s finally available! The paper was published in a 2015 issue of the Journal for Contextual Behavioral Science (JCBS). If you’re a member of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS)—the core organization behind ACT—you can access and download the paper for free by logging into the ACBS website. Under the “Resources” tab, click on the “Journal for Contextual Behavioral Science” link. There is a list of issues. Our paper was published in “Volume 4 (2015) Issues 3-4.” The Science Direct link is here.

If you’d like to find out more about the Portland ACT peer consultation group, you can click on this page to find out about meeting times, as well as download copies of the mission statement, meeting structure, and a description of the roles.

The main point I’ve tried to emphasize to people in workshops is that our model is just one way of structuring the meetings—the most important thing is to have some sort of structure. Once you agree upon a structure, only then can you evaluate what is and is not working. Feel free to drop me a line if you’d like some consultation for how to get your own group started.

Article (Portland Psychotherapy authors bolded): Thompson, B. T., Luoma, J. B., Terry, C., LeJeune, J., Guinther, P., & Robb, H. (2015). Creating a Peer-Led Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Consultation Group: The Portland Model. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 4(3), 144-150.

Brian Thompson Ph.D.

Author: Brian Thompson Ph.D.

Brian is a licensed psychologist and Director of the Portland Psychotherapy Anxiety Clinic. His specialties include generalized anxiety, OCD, hair pulling, and skin picking.

UPCOMING TRAINING EVENTS


Acceptance & Commitment Therapy – An Experiential & Practical Introduction

Jason Luoma, PhD and Jenna LeJeune, PhD
November 13th and 14th, 2021 from 8:30am-4:30pm
at Hilton Garden Inn Portland Airport
This two-day in-person workshop provides a thorough overview of the theory, principles, and techniques of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. It is intended for those who are relatively new to ACT and for those who have done some reading on their own about ACT but who may not have had the opportunity to participate in more experiential learning, observe models, or receive feedback while using the ACT model. Read More.


Ethical & Legal Considerations in Psychedelic Integration Therapy

Brian Pilecki, PhD and Jason Luoma, PhD
November 19th, 2021 from 9am-11am

There is an increasing demand from clients seeking therapeutic support in their personal use of psychedelics. However, many clinicians interested in psychedelic preparation and integration are unsure as to how to provide these services as psychedelics mostly remain illegal. In this workshop, we will outline legal and ethical frameworks relevant to providing therapy to clients around their personal use of psychedelics, as well as describe how harm reduction approaches are suitable for this developing clinical area. Read More.


De-Mystifying Self-As-Context in ACT: Practical Strategies for Clients

Brian Pilecki, PhD and Kati Lear, PhD
December 3rd, 2021 from 12pm-1:30pm

This workshop will outline how self-as-context can be used to conceptualize commonly discussed topics in therapy such as self-esteem, confidence, identity, and inner conflict. Participants will learn how to flexibly practice practical self-as-context interventions that can be used with clients, as well as have a chance to practice newly learned skills through structured role-play exercises in breakout groups. Read More.


Values in Therapy: An Intro to Working with Values from an ACT Perspective

Jenna LeJeune, PhD
January 21, 2022 from 12pm-2:00pm

This workshop will provide a theoretical and conceptual overview of values from a contextual behavioral science perspective. We will cover the “what”, “why”, “when”, and “how” of values within ACT. While we will also provide an overview of various values exercises and measures that can be used with clients, the emphasis in this workshop will be on providing a foundational framework that will help clinicians approach values work from a functional perspective rather than a primarily technique-focused approach. Read More.



Culturally Responsive Therapy: How to Apply Anti-Racist Values in Session

Christy Tadros, LPCC and RaQuel Neal, LCSW
February 4th, 2022 from 1:30pm-4:45pm
and February 5th from 9:00am-12:00pm

This 2 day 6-hour training will help therapists develop their ability to support clients from a different racial background than them, with a particular focus on Black, Indigenous and People of Color. Through a multicultural social justice framework, it will integrate research and clinical experience to teach a therapeutic model for rapport building, assessment, and treatment. This model is not a rigid therapeutic modality, but provides a contextual lens to build a strong, culturally grounded therapeutic relationship. It is a flexible model and can align with many therapeutic modalities, including a contextual behavioral approach to therapy. Read More.


Truffle Hunting: Bringing Values to Life in the Therapy Room

Jenna LeJeune, PhD
February 25, 2022 from 12pm-2:00pm

This brief workshop is designed to help clinicians deepen their values work with clients by shifting the focus from the content of values conversations to the quality of those conversation. By listening for and deepening the qualities of effective values conversations participants will get a taste for how more experiential and relationally-based values work can supercharge therapy. Participants will have opportunities to both observe demonstrations and practice in small groups with the benefit of feedback. Read More.


Values Prototyping: Using Action to Help Clients Explore Their Values

Jenna LeJeune, PhD
March 18, 2022 from 12pm-2:00pm

This workshop will focus on one specific experiential tool called “values prototyping” that helps clients learn more about their values through engaging in intentional valuing. As participants will hopefully already have a solid foundation of some of the core concepts of the values process in ACT, this workshop will dive right in on how to use values prototyping to help clients learn more about what they would choose to value in their life. You will have the chance to practice developing a values prototype in small groups with the benefit of feedback, so that by the end of the workshop you will be able to use this tool in your work with clients. Read More.


The Invitation to Change Approach: Helping Families Affected by Addiction

Jeff Foote, PhD and Cordelia Kraus, LPC, CADC 1, certified CRAFT clinician
May 13th and 14th, 2022 from 9:00am-5:00pm
at University of Portland, Terrace Room
This two-day in-person workshop will provide skills training for professionals focused on the process of working with clients who have a loved one struggling with substance use issues. The Invitation to Change Approach draws on CRAFT (Community Reinforcement and Family Training), MI (Motivational Interviewing), and ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) to provide a compassionate and collaborative way of working with the families and concerned significant others of people who struggle with substance use. Read More.


Therapy and Research in Psychedelic Science (TRIPS) Seminar Series

Second Friday of each month from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (PT)

TRIPS is an online seminar series that hosts speakers discussing science-informed presentations and discussions about psychedelics to educate healthcare professionals. This series was created to guide healthcare providers and students preparing to be professionals towards the most relevant, pragmatic, and essential information about psychedelic-assisted therapy, changing legal statuses, and harm reduction approaches in order to better serve clients and communities. This seminar series is a fundraiser for our clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder that Portland Psychotherapy investigators are preparing for and starting in the Fall of 2021. All proceeds after presenter remuneration will go to fund this clinical trial. Read more.

November 12th, 2021Psychedelic Research: Implications for Palliative Care and End-of-Life Existential Distress with Anthony Bossis, Ph.D.

December 10th, 2021Implementing Culturally-Attuned & Anti-Racist Psychedelic Therapy: Impact over Intention with Jamilah R. George, M.Div., M.S.

January 14th, 2022Psilocybin-Assisted Therapy of Major Depressive Disorder using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Therapeutic Frame with Jordan Sloshower, MD, MSc

February 11th, 2022 – Drug-Drug Interactions Between Psychiatric Medications and MDMA or Psilocybin with Aryan Sarparast, MD