Portland Psychotherapy Internal Grant Program

 

Purpose of the grant program

In addition to ongoing salary and administrative support for research, Portland Psychotherapy periodically releases funds for internal grant support for research grants and specialized training. The main aim of the grants is to support investigations that would otherwise not occur and to encourage innovation in research. Employees of Portland Psychotherapy and their direct collaborators are eligible to apply for grant awards through this program. Grants are awarded through the Research Lab at Portland Psychotherapy and are an expression of the Portland Psychotherapy mission. Grants are made possible by Portland Psychotherapy’s unique model for combining science and the practice of psychology.


Past Grants

Using Exposure to Increase Psychological Flexibility in Behavior Therapy Treatment for Skin Picking Disorder – Part 2

Principal Investigator: Brian Thompson, Ph.D. Amount: $2,521.80

Using Exposure to Increase Psychological Flexibility in Behavior Therapy Treatment for Skin Picking Disorder – Part 1

Principal Investigator: Brian Thompson, Ph.D. Amount: $3958.01

The Dalai Luoma Portland Psychotherapy Behavioral Science Research Grant/Award

Perspective Taking and Theory of Mind II

Principal Investigator: Paul Guinther, Ph.D.   Amount: $4,172.31

Exposure and Response Prevention with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Single Case Design Study – Phase 2

Principal Investigator: Brian Thompson, Ph.D.   Amount: $3358.85

Aaron S. Luoma Portland Psychotherapy Behavioral Science Research Grant/Award

Perspective Taking and Theory of Mind

Principal Investigator: Paul Guinther, Ph.D.    Amount: $4050.77

CBT-I Sleep Calculator

Principal Investigator: Scott Rower, Ph.D.      Amount: $850

Exposure and Response Prevention with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Single Case Design Study – Phase 1

Principal Investigator: Brian Thompson, Ph.D.   Amount: $4389.71


Grant Criteria

Eligibility

Eligible individuals are Portland Psychotherapy staff and their direct collaborators.  

Topics

Applications for grants on any topic within the domain of contextual behavioral science (CBS) and evidence-based psychotherapy are eligible for support.

Funding Scheme Aims

The aim of these awards is to provide financial support for innovative and original research projects of high quality and potential. The choice of theme and the design of the research rest entirely with the applicant (the Principal Investigator). The grants will provide funding for costs directly related to the proposed research (e.g. programming costs, participant payment, etc.). Furthermore, grants may provide salary support for the Principal Investigator and support research staff engaged on the project. Institutional F&A expenses will not be covered.

Grant applications are reviewed on the following criteria:

1. Importance:

  • Lead to professional presentations and publications.
  • Impact the behavior of clinicians, academicians, trainers, or policy makers.
  • Exhibit strong, sound, and valid research methods (e.g., design or scholarly approach).
  • Exhibit innovative methods (e.g., use of novel design, analyses, or scholarly approach).
  • Advance the purposes and aims of the Research Lab at Portland Psychotherapy and support the Portland Psychotherapy mission.

2. Likelihood of achieving goals described in the application: 

  • Involve investigators with a demonstrated history of follow-through on prior internal grant agreements.
  • Provide reasonable estimates of time and money requirements; can be completed within the specified parameters of the application.
  • As necessary, involve other collaborators (e.g., with special statistical skills) or collaborating organizations (e.g., providing equipment, infrastructure, or other resources) that would be required for project completion or that would otherwise enhance the probability of success.

3. Egalitarian need (i.e., fairness):

  • Involve research that is not likely to be funded at present by an alternative source.
  • Involve investigators who have previously been passed over for internal grant funding (i.e., for reasons other than rejected proposals or poor follow-through on prior grant agreements).