To those who feel afraid or hurt after the election

For many of us, these are frightening and uncertain times. We at Portland Psychotherapy want to make a declaration of support to the millions of people around the nation and here in Portland that have been targeted, oppressed, attacked, or silenced and to those who feel fearful of what may come.  Portland Psychotherapy does not endorse discrimination in any form and is invested in ensuring the safety of all members of our community.

If you feel marginalized, oppressed, angered, hurt, afraid, ashamed, or stigmatized, we want you to know you are welcome here.  You are all part of the community we love and serve. This is a safe place for you to speak and to be heard. We value you.

The Staff of Portland Psychotherapy

Resource Development for Insomnia Treatment

Resource Development for Insomnia Treatment

Do you practice CBT for Insomnia? 

Would you like to be involved in a community effort to create a needed resource?

In the field of behavioral sleep medicine (BSM), the sleep diary is an essential and ubiquitous tool. While there has been progress in creating a standard sleep diary form, there has not yet been any advances in providing practitioners with a common and easy to use interface for this standard.

This has left providers stuck with the task of calculating sleep data in inefficient  ways such as by pen and paper or ‘re-inventing the wheel’ by creating their own  means of calculating and tracking the data via MS excel or MS access. Large  amounts of time and creativity are lost as people’s efforts to tackle this problem are not shared with the community.

To address this problem Dr. Scott Rower is leading a team of people in the BSM community to create a simple and accessible user interface based on the standardized consensus sleep diary.  This freely available webpage will allow any provider the ability to calculate their patient’s sleep data in order to inform treatment decision making.

Want to get involved?  Learn more here.

This project is funded through an internal grant at Portland Psychotherapy Clinic, Research & Training Center

Newest Data on Shame and Drinking Published at Western Psychological Association Conference

Newest Data on Shame and Drinking Published at Western Psychological Association Conference

Last Friday, Portland Psychotherapy research assistants Monica Bahan, Megan Cheslock, and Jackie Potter presented a research poster at the annual Western Psychological Association convention, which took place in Portland. Their poster detailed findings from one of our ongoing studies exploring the relationship between shame, guilt, and drinking behavior. The findings were based on the first 88 participants in the study, all volunteers from the Portland area.

Congratulations to Monica, Megan, and Jackie on their first presentation!

Jason Luoma, Ph.D.

Author: Jason Luoma, Ph.D.

Jason is a psychologist who researches ways to help people with chronic shame and stigma and also works clinically with people struggling with those same problems.

Marketing For the Evidence-Based Therapist

Marketing For the Evidence-Based Therapist

As a large body of therapies have been identified that are demonstrably effective, the field has shifted toward dissemination and implementation. For those who are out in practice, a main way we get evidence-based therapies to clients is through effective marketing. As the director of a growing clinic who has worn pretty much every hat (e.g., entrepreneur, biller, therapist, manager, bookkeeper, receptionist, accountant, janitor), I’ve had to learn a lot about marketing over the last several years. In particular, I’ve found that online marketing has been especially fruitful for our business.

In the process of doing some of our online marketing, a colleague asked me to make some recommendations for key books relating to marketing a private practice. I realized that I had no one book that covered most of the material that I had learned, but instead had learned through a variety of resources over the years, many of them online. Below lies a smattering of links and resources on online marketing that I’ve found useful over the years as well as some general comments about the important elements of a building a business as a therapist.

Search engine optimization (SEO)

Once you build a website, you need to hire someone to help you optimize your site and drive traffic to it. Just building a website is near useless if you don’t figure out how to get people to visit it. You should be able to get someone who can help you drive traffic to your website for $400 a month or less. You need to spend money on marketing in order to grow your business (or even to have a business usually). Marketing works, that’s why we have so much of it around us. It changes behavior and will bring people to your doorstep. SEO professionals know how to bring more clients to your door. This is money well spent, once you have a website already up.

Some links to get you started on what SEO is and how to do it:

http://www.seomoz.org/blog/the-beginners-checklist-for-small-business-seo

Private practice marketing

If you need some help with business strategies overall, most areas of the country have a small business development center. Look up your local center. They often provide very affordable and expert training that is perfect for mental health professionals trying to expand their business knowledge. I’ve learned a lot from my local SBDC. http://www.sba.gov/content/small-business-development-centers-sbdc

Some good articles can be found here: http://www.uncommonpractices.com/articles.html

This is my favorite book about running a private practice in terms of recommendations on how to do marketing: Getting Started in Private Practice: The Complete Guide to Building Your Mental Health Practice

Website design

Three tips:

1) Put a contact form on the front page of your website and the contact page, rather than relying on people to call you. You’ll get a lot more contacts that way.

2) Learn how to use WordPress to set up your site. It’s simple and easy to use once you’ve learned how to set it up.

3) Get your site noticed and convert visitors to clients:

Business blogging and writing good content

Here’s a basic primer on writing good blog posts by a leading blog developer: http://www.davidrisley.com/blog-writing/

One of the oldest and most prolific blogs about blogging: http://www.copyblogger.com/blog/

General online marketing

Here’s a graphic to help you see all the possibilities for online marketing and organize your thinking: http://assets.unbounce.com/s/images/noob-guide-to-marketing-infographic-1800.png

Some basics on online marketing: http://counsellingresource.com/lib/practice/internet-marketing/

Some webinars if you like to watch those: http://www.hallme.com/archived-webinars.php

Social Media Marketing

Some tips on how to embrace social media and the latest changes in Google to your advantage: http://www.psychotherapynetworker.org/magazine/recentissues/2012-mayjune/item/1708-in-consultation

A psychotherapist’s guide to Facebook and Twitter: Why clinicians should give a tweet – http://www.psychotherapy.net/article/psychotherapists-guide-social-media

Dr. Keely Kolmes’ private practice social media policy – http://www.drkkolmes.com/docs/socmed.pdf

Online business models

You might want to write a business plan. Here’s a template:

http://www.copyblogger.com/smart-people-business-plan/

I don’t know of anyone better at it and who produces better content on running a business online than Pat at Smart Passive Income. His podcast is super-popular, interesting, and very relevant: http://www.smartpassiveincome.com/

Pay-per-click advertising (PPC)

 

Really the only place you need to advertise is with google adwords. It’s not too hard to set up a basic account, set a budget and try it out. Here are some ideas on how to do that: http://adwords.google.com/select/Login

Adwords for therapists: http://www.uncommonpractices.com/adwords.html

Optimizing quality score: http://www.redflymarketing.com/blog/how-to-improve-quality-score-the-ultimate-guide/

Newsletters

Before putting your efforts into blogging, first create a following with an email list to directly connect with local, potential clients in a more direct way

http://uncommonpractices.wordpress.com/2009/04/22/why-blogging-is-a-waste-of-time-for-private-practitioners/

http://www.smartpassiveincome.com/email-list-strategies/

I like Mailchimp because the interface is very simplified and you are able to get a feel for creating and using newsletters for marketing your business without having to invest right from the start.  Your account is free as long as you have less than 2,000 subscribers and you send less than 12,000 emails per month.

http://mailchimp.com/

Other popular services include:

http://www.aweber.com/

http://www.constantcontact.com/

Face-to-face networking

My favorite book on this topic is: Never Eat Alone

And if you are looking to improve your social skills, speaking abilities, and ability to just interact with others and make conversation, I don’t know a better place than Toastmasters, which I have been a member of for years. To find a meeting near you: http://reports.toastmasters.org/findaclub/

See if there is a meetup group in your area either of therapists or other professionals in your area of interest.

Finding your passion

And Don’t do any of these things if it doesn’t align with your passion: http://zenhabits.net/the-short-but-powerful-guide-to-finding-your-passion/

Team Up

Check with your state’s psychological association to see if they have any events scheduled to learn more about marketing.

See if you can find a “practice buddy” — another local mental health practitioner who has similar goals and who can meet with you to brainstorm ideas regarding seminars, networking groups to attend, accessing each other’s networks, and setting goals for putting these tips to work.

Do you have favorites? Send me a message about those and I’ll check them out. Who knows, maybe they’ll make it onto the list.

Defending behavioral science

Defending behavioral science

A couple weeks ago, the New York Times posted an opinion piece which presented a very pessimistic and narrow view of the behavioral sciences. While I agreed with some of the points of the author, particularly the need for more randomized controlled trials of psychosocial interventions, I also think he “threw the baby out with the bathwater.” While we haven’t solved all the problems of humanity through behavioral science research, we have managed to discover a range of interventions that have been shown to work.

In response to the NY Times article, a local colleague and friend at Oregon Research Institute, Tony Biglan, wrote an excellent response. In his post, he outlines some of the research-based intervention that have been shown to work.

In a time of decreasing funding for research and particulary for behavioral research, it’s important that we advocate for the importance of science-based psychotherapy and related psychosocial interventions. If you like this piece, consider passing it on, blogging about it, or tweeting it. There are buttons right at the bottom of this page that make it easy to pass along.

UPCOMING TRAINING EVENTS

How to be Experiential in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Jason Luoma, Ph.D.
April 23, 2021 from 12-1pm

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is, at its core, an experiential treatment, but is frequently delivered in a non-experiential way. Experiential learning involves going beyond verbal discussion, insight, and explanations of experience. But how do we do this in ACT and how do we know when we are spending too much time engaged in non-experiential modes of learning? This workshop will outline a simple model you can use to identify when you are in less or more experiential modes during therapy and easy methods to switch to more experiential modes. You will then have a chance to practice it in breakout groups and get feedback. Read More.


Ethical & Legal Considerations in Psychedelic Integration Therapy

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Brian Pilecki, Ph.D.
May 7, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop is based on extensive research and writing we have conducted into the legal and ethical issues of working with psychedelics in the current regulatory climate, as well as clinical practice doing harm reduction and integration therapy with psychedelics. It is informed by consultation with multiple experts on harm reduction, as well as attorneys knowledgeable about criminal and civil matters relating to drug use and professional practice. We will share with you all we know so that you can be more informed in the decisions you are making in your practice and be better able to decide whether to jump into this kind of work if you are considering it. Read More.


Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Brian Pilecki, Ph.D.
May 21, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop provides a chance to learn concrete methods for conceptualizing cases from the perspective of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Formulating a useful case conceptualization is a foundational clinical skill that is essential in delivering effective treatment, and one that can be often overlooked in the process of working with clients. Participants will learn several formats for doing formal case conceptualization outside of session as a means to further develop knowledge and skill with ACT theory, as well as to learn a means to enhance treatment planning. The importance of ongoing case conceptualization throughout a course of treatment will be emphasized, as well as common pitfalls in conceptualizing client problems. Participants will also have a chance to practice newly learned skills with a case in breakout groups. Read More.


ACT Precision Training: In-Session Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Help You be Focused and Strategic in Your Interventions

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D
June 18, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop provides a chance to learn and practice in-session, in-the-moment case conceptualization of cases from the perspective of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This workshop focuses on helping you use ACT theory & in-session clinical markers to make more precise and strategic interventions. The main goal of this workshop is to help you become more adept at identifying in-session client behaviors that are indicators for particular ACT processes that are likely to be most relevant. The workshop uses a process we call ACT Circuit Training, which involves intensive analysis of a video of an ACT session and intentional practice in conceptualizing client behavior and generating possible ACT responses, followed by discussion and feedback. Read More.


ACT Agility Training: In-Session Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Increase Flexible Responding

Jason Luoma, Ph.D. and Jenna LeJeune, Ph.D
July 16, 2021 from 12-2pm

This workshop provides a chance to learn and practice in-session, in-the-moment case conceptualization of cases from the perspective of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This workshop is intended to help therapists be more flexible and nimble in their use of ACT processes, strengthening their ability to fluidly shift as needed between processes within sessions. Therapist learning ACT often develop tunnel vision, focusing too much on particular processes or responding rigidly when more flexibility is needed. Read More.


Therapy and Research in Psychedelic Science (TRIPS) Seminar Series

Second Friday of each month from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (PT)

TRIPS is an online seminar series that hosts speakers discussing science-informed presentations and discussions about psychedelics to educate healthcare professionals. This series was created to guide healthcare providers and students preparing to be professionals towards the most relevant, pragmatic, and essential information about psychedelic-assisted therapy, changing legal statuses, and harm reduction approaches in order to better serve clients and communities. This seminar series is a fundraiser for our clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder that Portland Psychotherapy investigators are preparing for and starting in the Fall of 2021. All proceeds after presenter remuneration will go to fund this clinical trial. Read more.

April 9th, 2021 – Ketamine 101: An Introduction to Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy with Gregory Wells, Ph.D.
May 14th, 2021  Research on MDMA and Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy: An Overview of the Evidence for Clinicians with Jason Luoma, Ph.D.
June 11th, 2021 Becoming a Psychedelic-Informed Therapist: Toward Developing Your Own Practice with Nathan Gates, M.A., LCPC